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The epidemiology of autistic spectrum disorders: is the prevalence rising?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12216059&dopt=Abstract

 
: Ment Retard Dev Disabil Res Rev 2002;8(3):151-61 Related Articles,

The epidemiology of autistic spectrum disorders: is the prevalence rising?

Wing L, Potter D.

Centre for Social and Communication Disorders, Elliot House, Bromley, Kent, United Kingdom. elliot.house@nas.org.uk

For decades after Kanner's original paper on the subject was published in 1943, autism was generally considered to be a rare condition with a prevalence of around 2-4 per 10,000 children. Then, studies carried out in the late 1990s and the present century reported annual rises in incidence of autism in pre-school children, based on age of diagnosis, and increases in the age-specific prevalence rates in children. Prevalence rates of up to 60 per 10,000 for autism and even more for the whole autistic spectrum were reported. Reasons for these increases are discussed. They include changes in diagnostic criteria, development of the concept of the wide autistic spectrum, different methods used in studies, growing awareness and knowledge among parents and professional workers and the development of specialist services, as well as the possibility of a true increase in numbers. Various environmental causes for a genuine rise in incidence have been suggested, including the triple vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR]. Not one of the possible environmental causes, including MMR, has been confirmed by independent scientific investigation, whereas there is strong evidence that complex genetic factors play a major role in etiology. The evidence suggests that the majority, if not all, of the reported rise in incidence and prevalence is due to changes in diagnostic criteria and increasing awareness and recognition of autistic spectrum disorders. Whether there is also a genuine rise in incidence remains an open question. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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60 per 10,000 translates to 1/167. - SM


PMID: 12216059 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]